Articles

It’s been a month since the Chartered Institute of Information Security (CIISec) released its damning research into the state of gender equality and balance in cybersecurity.  How did the sector react to the findings? What, if anything, has actually happened as a result – and one month later, what exactly have we learned?

Richard Forrest, senior associate at one of the UK’s leading data breach solicitors Hayes Connor, provides five tips to reduce your risk of a data breach…

Online and offline criminals are mimicking big businesses, setting up corporate structures and offices to make operations more efficient and to act as cover. Organised crime researcher, lecturer and consultant Chris Allen explains that this level of sophistication means we all need to be wary

Increasing the variety of minds and people in our sector is not simply a nice-to-have: it’s an operational imperative. Owanate Bestman is a cybersecurity specialist recruiter with first-hand experience of creating gender-balanced security departments. Here’s how he does it…

In the first of a two-part series looking into how cybercriminals operate, organised crime consultant, lecturer and researcher Chris Allen looks at how and why people become cybercriminals and what we can do to stop them…

The process of signing and signatures has always been susceptible to fraud but as technology has progressed, the act of signing has become far more secure than in the past, to the point where wet signatures can be considered more risky compared to digital signatures, especially in the context of remote business.

In this long-read article, in association with Entrust, we look at why digital signatures are so paramount for security, and the connection it has with PKI.

There’s one defence against the criminals that needs a firmer push. Nina Paine, global head, cyber stakeholder and government engagement at Standard Chartered, explains how she’s behind a drive for creating a diversity of perspectives in cybersecurity – and why you should be too…

We’re all used to gloom and doom, political upheaval, pandemic woes, economic cliff-edges and all sorts of macro risks that, sometimes, we forget to look at the stuff that’s going right. To brighten this January, here’s one such example: hackers are failing to keep up with the pace of new vulnerabilities found in software and hardware.

The NHS is slowly replacing old, vulnerable technology, a new report reveals. And it’s an issue we all face. How do you keep complex systems up-to-date? How do you balance the importance of patching with the risk of disruption? And when does fit-for-purpose become dangerously outdated?